Fund Facts POS delivery rule coming in December?

first_img “If [regulators] really do publish in December,” said Burgess, “18 months from then you will be required to give Fund Facts to your clients before the final sale.” When the Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) proposed the regulatory reform in March 2014, they initially suggested a one-year transition period to deliver the documents before the sale of a mutual fund. The industry, on the other hand, asked for a two-year transition period, said Burgess. The new regulation will also provide a less time-consuming process for the delivery of Fund Facts than was first proposed five years ago. Originally, regulators said they wanted clients to acknowledge in writing that they had received the Fund Facts document. Now, Burgess said the rules allow clients to use other means to confirm that they received the documents and they’ve had an opportunity to read them. “[It’s] still another thing you’ll have to add to all those things you have to do before a trade,” said Burgess, “but not as bad as we used to think.” Clients will be able to confirm receipt of the documents through an email, by clicking on a link or through verbal communication. Burgess warned however that advisors must be careful to take detailed notes in cases where clients acknowledge receipt of the documents verbally. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Succession planning: Stuck in the ‘Terrible Toos’ Brand building no longer an option for advisors The requirement concerning the pre-sale delivery of Fund Facts disclosure documents could be finalized as early as December, according to Sian Burgess, senior vice president of fund oversight at Toronto-based Fidelity Investments Canada ULC, along with a longer than expected transition period. Burgess, who is also vice chairwoman of the Investment Funds Institute of Canada’s (IFIC) board of directors, spoke at the 12th annual Institute of Advanced Financial Planners (IAFP) Symposium in Calgary on Tuesday. Get snowbirds counting the dayscenter_img Keywords Fund Facts Selling your book? Work with an expert Related news Fiona Collie Facebook LinkedIn Twitterlast_img read more

Grains Research Precinct supporting long-term industry growth

first_imgGrains Research Precinct supporting long-term industry growth New Grains Research Precinct opened at Murdoch UniversityMcGowan Government contributed $250,000 towards establishmentInvestment will boost State’s scientific capacity and generate advances to grains productivity, profitability and sustainabilityAgriculture and Food Minister Alannah MacTiernan has welcomed the opening of the Grains Research Precinct in Perth today, which will accelerate scientific advancements that drive sustainable and profitable grains production in Western Australia.The McGowan Government contributed $250,000 towards the $7.45 million precinct, alongside a $4.5 million Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) Infrastructure Grant, $2.255 million from Murdoch University and $445,000 from Curtin University.The state-of-the-art research facilities will augment Western Australian grains research across plant pathology, physiology, genetics and molecular biology, leading to the development of new, high performance crop varieties for the next generation.The facilities feature eight high containment glasshouses, 0.9 hectares of irrigated, netted field plots and ancillary infrastructure at Murdoch University and a controlled environment facility at Curtin University.The Precinct will provide a ‘hub’ for collaboration between academia and the public and private sectors to ensure WA’s valuable grains industry is at the forefront of global scientific advances in grains production so it can remain internationally competitive.The new asset will complement the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development’s extensive grains research facilities and activities at Northam, Merredin, Esperance, Geraldton, Wongan Hills and South Perth, as well as field work with grower groups around the Grainbelt.As stated by Agriculture and Food Minister Alannah MacTiernan:“This new addition to WA’s grains research facilities will boost the State’s scientific capacity and help support industry’s future sustainability and profitability.“The Grains Research Precinct provides a platform to harness the skills, knowledge and experience from Murdoch and Curtin Universities, as well as our DPIRD scientists and other parties.“The precinct adds to DPIRD’s work with Murdoch University in the Western Crop Genetics Alliance, Curtin University’s Centre for Crop and Disease Management, and our longstanding partnership with the GRDC.“WA’s grains industry is an important contributor to the State economy, worth more than $6 billion per annum, so it is imperative our scientists are equipped with the scientific assets, tools and knowledge to optimise grains production and capitalise on market opportunities.“Scientific investments like the Grains Research Precinct are essential to ensure WA’s grains industry remains at the top of its game so grain growers and industry can compete in an increasingly complex, dynamic global marketplace and secure enduring economic growth.” /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Agriculture, Australia, Australian, Curtin University, environment, Government, infrastructure, molecular biology, regional development, South Perth, sustainability, sustainable, university, WA, Western Australia, Wongan Hillslast_img read more

CU-Boulder Chemist Wins National Honor

first_imgThe American Chemical Society has given a prestigious national award to a renowned University of Colorado at Boulder professor. W. Carl Lineberger was announced as the winner of the 2004 Peter Debye Award in Physical Chemistry for his outstanding and extraordinary contributions to the understanding of chemical energetics, molecular structures and solvent dynamics through the study of charged particles, or ions. Lineberger is an E.U. Condon Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry and a JILA fellow. His selection was first announced in Chemical & Engineering News. Lineberger will travel to Anaheim, Calif., for a formal presentation of the award next March in conjunction with the 227th American Chemical Society National Meeting. The award includes a certificate and a $5,000 prize. Lineberger said his work is driven by the desire to envision chemical reactions at the molecular level. “The thing that has always appealed to me has been the idea that one can actually combine experiments and theory together in a way that, when molecules come together and undergo a chemical reaction, you really can visualize the detailed dance they go through,” he said. The Debye Award, sponsored by E.I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co., was established in 1960 to encourage and reward outstanding theoretical or experimental research in physical chemistry. Some consideration is given to nominees’ successes as mentors and colleagues, according to the American Chemical Society. “In the physical sciences, your students are your hands and your head in so many ways, and I’ve been very blessed to have outstanding people working with me,” Lineberger said. “I feel very honored to be included among the distinguished recipients of this award.” “The department is very pleased,” said Professor Veronica Vaida, chair of the CU-Boulder chemistry and biochemistry department. “This award is recognizing highly distinguished scientists in the field of physical chemistry and their contributions to the field. We’re very honored Professor Lineberger received this award.” Published: Nov. 9, 2003 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-maillast_img read more

Blixt leads by 1 despite Na’s hot day at Colonial

first_imgFORT WORTH, Texas – Kevin Na enjoys Colonial and has the cluster of low rounds to prove it. Na eagled the par-5 first hole Friday on the way to an 8-under 62, his third score at least that good in the past six rounds on the cozy course made famous by Ben Hogan. Na, tied for second at 8 under with first-round leader Tony Finau, trailed Jonas Blixt by one halfway through Colonial. After opening with a 62 and closing with a course record-tying 61 to finish fourth last year, Na followed the eagle with six birdies in a bogey-free round after being happy to shoot par 70 on a windy afternoon in the first round. ”One of those golf courses I look forward to coming to,” said Na, a two-time PGA Tour winner who puts Colonial in his top three along with Riviera and Hilton Head. ”Fits my game. You’ve got to take advantage of those weeks because there is not too many golf courses like this on tour anymore.” Blixt, a three-time winner playing with Na, holed out from 132 yards for eagle on No. 17 and shot 64 to reach 9 under. Finau, playing the back nine first, started with nine straight pars before three birdies and a bogey on his final nine for a 68. Local favorite Jordan Spieth, a shot off the lead to start the day, shot 70 and was four behind Blixt. Defending champion Justin Rose, the highest-ranked player in the field at No. 3, shot 67 and was 1 over, one stroke above the cut line. Rory Sabbatini, the 2007 Colonial champion, shot 66 and was alone in fourth at 6 under. Jim Furyk, the 2003 U.S. Open champion who hasn’t won in four years, shot 66 and was among five at 5 under. Blixt, a three-time tour winner, had a little more success navigating the wind than Na in the first round, shooting 67. Both were thinking more about hanging on while hoping to make a move in the second round. Na didn’t waste any time, hitting his second shot to 3 feet for the easy eagle before three birdies on putts of at least 30 feet. After Blixt went up two shots with his pitching wedge from 132 yards at 17, Na pulled within one with a closing birdie when his approach settled inside 5 feet. ”Well, I was trying to do it, so …” Blixt said about his eagle, the 35-year-old Swede pausing for effect without smiling. Full-field scores from the Charles Schwab Challenge Charles Schwab Challenge: Articles, photos and videos ”Nah, so the last two times I played the hole it’s been the same kind of wind. We’ve been thinking it’s like left-to-right wind or almost into us, so today I just played more like a little downwind.” Jason Dufner got to 8 under with four straight birdies and a 25-foot putt to save par. But the two-time Colonial runner-up missed a short birdie putt at No. 6, his 15th hole, and bogeyed three of the last four for a 68 that left him at 5 under. Spieth made birdie putts of 50 feet on No. 10 and 46 feet at 12, giving him three putts of more than 40 feet in the same tournament for the first time after making a 46-footer in the first round. But the three-time major winner missed three par putts under 10 feet among his five bogeys. ”I thought today was average; I thought yesterday was spectacular,” Spieth said. ”Today I missed maybe an 8-footer and a couple 5-footers, but then I made a couple long ones to make up for it. They were kind of misreads. They weren’t bad strokes. That’s the difference.” Rickie Fowler missed the cut by one shot at 3 over, ending a streak of 21 straight cuts made. It was tied for the second-longest active streak with Tommy Fleetwood and Hideki Matsuyama, one behind Jason Kokrak (22). Other than the 16th-ranked Finau, Colonial has been unkind to the eight players in field among the top 20 in the world rankings. Francesco Molinari, ranked seventh, and Rose are the only others playing on the weekend. Molinari joined Rose at 1 over after a double bogey on his last hole. No. 11 Jon Rahm shot 71 and missed the cut at 6 over after finishing in the top five in both of his first two Colonials the past two years. Eighth-ranked Bryson DeChambeau (4 over) and No. 9 Xander Schauffele (6 over) missed along with Fowler (10th). Paul Casey, ranked 13th, withdrew because of flu-like symptoms after opening with a 69. Two-time Colonial winner Zach Johnson shot 75 to finish 7 over, missing the cut for the second straight year after playing on the weekend in his first 12 Fort Worth appearances. Brian Harman put himself under par for the tournament on his last hole when his approach shot at 9 bounced off the grandstand behind the green and rolled within 2 feet of the hole. He made the birdie putt and handed the ball to a fan sitting not far from where it caromed.last_img read more

Funeral to take place this afternoon of Bishop James Mehaffey

first_img Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic The funeral takes place this afternoon of Bishop James Mehaffey, the former Bishop of Derry and Raphoe.Bishop Mehaffey, who had been ill for some time, died on Monday night.He was 88.Donal Kavanagh has more:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/donmehaffey.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. By News Highland – January 11, 2020 Facebook Twitter Facebook Pinterest News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Funeral to take place this afternoon of Bishop James Mehaffey WhatsApp WhatsAppcenter_img Previous articleDerry police treating Envy Nightclub Fire as arsonNext article‘Money for Gweedore water pipe works re-allocated’ – Mac Giolla Easbuig News Highland FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR AudioHomepage BannerNews Google+ Pinterest Google+ DL Debate – 24/05/21 Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population growslast_img read more

People / Two new MDs appointed to lead merged Delta Cargo team

first_imgBy Alex Lennane 13/01/2021 More changes at Delta Cargo, after the carrier last month announced it was subsuming the cargo department into its commercial arm.It has appointed two executives, Jannie Davel (right) as managing director commercial and Vishal Bhatnagar (left) as MD global cargo operations.Mr Davel has a strong air freight background, spending two years as vice president cargo commercial Americas for Emirates SkyCargo and prior to that, 12 years at DHL Global Forwarding, most recently as senior vice president airfreight Americas.Mr Bhatnagar has been at Delta for nearly four years, as director cargo operational performance and customer experience, after nearly 15 years at Lufthansa Cargo, as head of operations and processes, the Americas.“Jannie and Vishal are visionary industry leaders, providing real strength to our leadership team,” said Rob Walpole, vice president Delta Cargo.“This year will continue to be a period of both challenge and opportunity. With the global industry focus on distributing Covid-19 vaccines alongside supporting our customers during a period where global supply chains continue to face disruptions and structural hurdles, our new leadership team stands ready to assist our customers.”Mr Davel will lead the cargo commercial activities including sales, alliances and product management. Mr Bhatnagar will lead the global cargo operations team. The carrier said he had been instrumental in the development of its Cargo Control Center and had “built numerous key business functions focused on expanding services and improving both the customer experience and operations execution capabilities”.last_img read more

Ga. Parole Board Delays Clemency Ruling For Death Row Inmate

first_img Legal Advocate Discusses Medical Abuse At Shut Down Georgia ICE Facility For Whom The Bell Rings Add to My List In My List Related Stories Share The Georgia Board of Pardons and Paroles said late Tuesday that it’s delaying a clemency ruling overnight until the board finishes reviewing documents presented in a day-long hearing.The board expects to have a decision on Steven Frederick Spears’ case by Wednesday, while his execution is scheduled for later that night.  Spears was convicted for the 2001 murder of his ex-girlfriend, Sherri Holland, in Dalonegha, Georgia.Spears has not filed any appeals of his own and his lawyer says Spears has refused to meet with him since a resentencing hearing last year.On Monday, Spears’ ex-wife and mother to one of his children filed an appeal on his behalf, claiming he hasn’t tried to stop his execution because he’s suffering from mental illness. In the petition, a psychologist who has reviewed Spears’ case, but who has not met him, argued a mental health professional should assess the inmate’s competence.The brief goes on to describe Spears’ lifetime of documented abuse, neglect and poverty, as well as a family history of mental illness.  If his clemency is denied, Spears will become the eighth person executed by the state of Georgia this year – the most here since the death penalty was reinstated in the 1970s.Like us on Facebook ‘It’s Fractured’: Georgia Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan On Healing Republican Partylast_img read more

Ten surprising things battle royale can teach us

first_imgTen surprising things battle royale can teach usWill Luton reflects on the lessons developers and publishers can learn from the rise of Fortnite, PUBG and their rivalsWill LutonThursday 30th August 2018Share this article Recommend Tweet ShareBattle royale’s exponential rise has been the A plot for video games in 2018, with the gritty and complex PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds and the slick, chiselled Fortnite in the leading roles. While there’s as many takes on the success of the genre as there are players, it is clear that the ascent is thanks in part to the irreverence the genre’s key creators have show toward conventional industry wisdom. This justified impudence means there are a wealth of surprising lessons from the genre that will help us all make better games.1. You Can Be PunishingIf someone would have told you that the breakout game of 2018 would see see you grind loot only to instantly die and lose everything in 99 out of 100 games, would you have believed them? Much of the beauty of the battle royale genre is in players facing punishing failings and being willing to jump back in.The trend in design in the past decade has been in protecting the player from negative feedback. Perhaps the pinnacle of this thinking can be seen in Overwatch, where kill-death ratios are replaced with medals for a tangential actions such as time on the objective or healing done.Meanwhile battle royale games slap you around the face and scream “you fucked up” over and over. Yet as these failures are so fair – after all, it’s another player and not the game that killed you – they put the player on a skill progression path they’re happy to follow through negative feedback alone. This harsh failure is reminiscent of the golden era of arcades and reminds us that it is okay to give a player an uncushioned fail condition. But only if the player can take a learning from their loss that will bring them back to play.2. F2P Wins, Even In CoreOne of the most interesting tales from battle royale’s rise is in the fight for prominence between two games that took wildly different approaches: PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds was a mid-priced title that was followed six months later by the free-to-play Fortnite. Despite being later to the market, Epic’s game has emphatically won in terms of players and revenue.While the power of free should now be obvious to anyone in the industry, it had seemed like the core PC and console market was a staunch holdout. While there are many factors that led to Fortnite’s success, such as better accessibility and quality of execution (see ‘Speed and Quality Matters’), the biggest contributor to Fortnite’s growth was its lack of entry price: anyone could drag in any of their buddies to play with only the friction of a download. Having seen this dynamic at play in both League of Legends and Hearthstone, it’s now clear that following a paid model in core PvP will at best leave you in second place.3. Speed and Quality MattersSecondary to price, Fortnite also trumped PUBG in another area: post-launch execution. PUBG is a marvel for a new team on a limited timescale, especially considering this was creative director Brendan Greene’s first commercial game. Yet Fortnite was built upon more stable foundations, starting life as an existing game with a natural fit for a battle royale mode.Epic were able to update more quickly and with greater focus on the things that mattered to players: gameplay variety and kickass cosmetics. Meanwhile, PUBG struggled with hefty machine requirements, niggling bugs, design debt, and muddy focus, leaving an annoyed and less evangelical fanbase. As such, PUBG suffered a comparatively weaker word of mouth growth than the slick and nimble Fortnite.As games become more and more a service, a focus on quality of life, well directed improvement and live events is as important as any other marketing efforts. A well serviced game simply gets more players, but it also keeps them longer.4. Cosmetics Can Take You to Top GrossingIn the early days of free-to-play, much talk around monetisation focused on hats and other trivial cosmetics, but as the market evolved we collectively concluded that convenience and competitive advantage were much stronger drivers. It was a great surprise when Fortnite became the first cosmetic-driven economy to maintain a top grossing position in the App Store.However, there is something unique about battle royale games: each and every match, there is a ready-made audience of 100 players, each eager to differentiate themselves. Skins, then, become a way to signal a player’s wealth and dedication, driving higher engagement and unprecedented levels of spend on vanity. In Fortnite, this monetisation desire is amplified by the clever Battle Pass system that, much like Clash Royale’s chests, makes spending less like buying and more like releasing rewards for your own past efforts.While Fortnite’s spend per player is probably much lower than that of many of the more traditionally and aggressively monetised mobile games it has managed to open up a considerably larger audience.5. The Mod Scene Is A Primordial SoupAt the turn of the decade, it seemed like the indie scene would be the source of a renewed creativity through the industry, bringing incredible new experiences and demographics to gaming. While that failed to pass, the amateur modding community has inadvertently stepped up: most notably with MOBA and now battle royale.Freed from commercial expectations and emboldened by a hacker mentality, the mod scene has become the primordial soup of game genres. Many ideas, from sloppy to inspired, are experimented with: if a mod draws an audience then it gains more contributors or spin-offs, with the idea mutating and building. The first battle royale mod appeared in 2012 on top of Minecraft, taking five years to shape up to be what we know today through a handful of key contributors.With such a diverse worldwide pool of creators that works so quickly and creatively within the mod scene today, and while the rest of us work in much smaller creative bounds, the future undoubtedly holds more genres sparked into existence by those thinking no further than “wouldn’t it be cool if…”6. Genre Evolution Is RapidOnce a game hits, there’s the inevitable rush of developer FOMO, triggering gamers to call copycat and pundits to decry a dearth of industry creativity. However, amongst this clammer and jibber jabber, it’s easy to miss what is actually happening: the rapid evolution of a genre.While battle royale has already seen six years of refinement from the mod scene, in the past few months alone we’ve seen interesting takes on the genre: Realm Royale introduced crafting and Totally Accurate Battlegrounds explores surrealist humour and experimental weapons. And there’s more interesting takes coming that bring PvE and thousand-player matches or attempt to fit inside existing franchises. While most of these takes are likely to fail, they will do so finding the edges and helping to propel the genre to new, yet to be considered creative heights.It’s at times like these that it is worth remembering that as developers of the mid-nineties began to pioneer defining mechanics for what we now know as the first person shooter genre that their works were dubbed “Doom clones”.7. Cross Platform Is Now PC, Console and MobileCross platform has traditionally referred to multiple console SKUs, perhaps with a later PC port. But in less than a year since launch, both PUBG and Fortnite have moved from PC and console to mobile with impressive success.The consensus since the advent of touchscreen phones is that virtual controls are fiddly and inaccurate. But utilising the rapidly improving virtual controls from Chinese titles such as Arena of Valor, both Fortnite and PUBG have managed to make very playable mobile versions that have resulted in impressive financials.Additionally, Fortnite’s crossplay features now allows for players from any platform to group with and play against players on any other platform. This crumbles the traditional walled gardens of console generations past and means the lines between platforms are increasingly blurred. Epic are leading a charge to make platforms an irrelevant part of a players experience and it’s a direction we should all follow.8. Systemic Gameplay + Players = StoriesOne of the most unique and exciting characteristics of battle royale is the ability for the games to create stories: Maybe in one match your team avoids enemy fire by backflipping a motorbike off a cliff and the next game you spend 20 minutes silently peeking out of a hut.This story creation is achieved by putting lots of real players inside a game world packed with overlapping and intentionally flexible systems, resulting in what game designers call emergent behavior. Emergent behavior describes intended but unforeseen interactions between players and multiple game mechanics. There have been lots of deeply systemic games that give rise to emergent behavior – Dwarf Fortress being a classic example. However, battle royale games are the first time a systemic game has used a massively multiplayer environment effectively.MMORPGs, while system-heavy, have players follow the questlines designers planned for them: the experience of any two players beating a raid is comparatively similar. Battle royale games break free of prescriptive paths by giving players space and an array of tools that can be used in conjunction with or against other players. The result is players having a sense of authorship and intrigue as the game plays out around them, but as a byproduct it also makes battle royale games very watchable.9. The Power of EsportsWhile battle royale is something of an awkward esport due to the sheer number of players, the emergent stories makes for inherently interesting streaming, pushing both Fortnite and PUBG to the top of Twitch’s most-streamed list.With a daily audience of 15 million, Twitch has become a major resource for players to uncover a community as well as new games. And it’s this free exposure that has allowed battle royale to grow so rapidly with little investment. Epic, knowing this, has written a huge love letter to streamers with a willy-waving $100 million prize pot. This investment is aimed at attracting the best esports teams, meaning more coverage, more hours streamed, more viewers and more Battle Pass purchases.While it’s hard to be sure if that $100 million is a wise investment, it indicates just how much is at stake in getting esports players and streamers to put a game in front of their audience and keep it there.10. Gaming Is Now Pop CultureFrom Drake on Twitch to the England’s footballers flossing, the success of Fortnite has shown us that gaming is no longer a pop culture outsider. During the ‘Pac-Mania’ of the ’80s to Lara Croft’s brief stint of as an icon in the ’90s, it always felt as if games were coming to mainstream culture as a passing novelty.Related JobsSenior Game Designer – UE4 – AAA United Kingdom Amiqus GamesProgrammer – REMOTE – work with industry veterans! North West Amiqus GamesJunior Video Editor – GLOBAL publisher United Kingdom Amiqus GamesDiscover more jobs in games Fortnite, however, feels like the first time the wider media is addressing gaming on the same terms it would music, film, TV or the press. With each passing year, more game-natives reach leadership roles within media, bringing an understanding of gaming that is is reflected in the way their outlets discuss games. While there is still some scaremongering, there’s also a great diversity in how Fortnite is reported. For example, the BBC covered Ninja’s decision not to play with female streamers with an assumption of reader knowledge akin to any other celebrity news.And there’s good reason for the BBC to assume an audience’s understanding: as of June, Fortnite had a player base of 125 million, a number equal to Netflix’s worldwide subscriber count. Battle royale is a turning point where gaming did more than beat mainstream media in revenue but gained the same cultural validity. Today, gaming isn’t the reserve of a small niche demographic; it’s an entertainment choice for as many people as watch movies or listen to music. Gaming is now pop culture.Will Luton is a product director specialising in mobile free-to-play games and an industry consultant. He has worked with major firms such as Rovio, Sega, Jagex and Nexon.Celebrating employer excellence in the video games industry8th July 2021Submit your company Sign up for The Daily Update and get the best of GamesIndustry.biz in your inbox. Enter your email addressMore storiesAdopt Me developers unveil new studio, Uplift GamesTeam behind hit Roblox game has grown to over 40 employeesBy Danielle Partis 11 hours agoDeveloper wins against Grand Theft Auto DMCA takedownTake-Two loses claim to reversed-engineered source made by fansBy Danielle Partis 15 hours agoLatest comments Sign in to contributeEmail addressPasswordSign in Need an account? Register now.last_img read more

Ingeteam expands O&M operations

first_imgIngeteam expands O&M operationsThe Spanish company has gained a foothold in the PV operation and maintenance market in Honduras and Uruguay while also winning new contracts in the U.K. and Panama, solidifying its position as a leading O&M player around the globe. October 14, 2015 Edgar Meza Installations Manufacturing Markets Markets & Policy Share Spanish electrical engineering group Ingeteam has signed four new PV operation and maintenance contracts in Panama, the United Kingdom, Honduras and Uruguay, opening new markets for the company in the latter two countries.Ingeteam’s latest deals expand its operations in Latin America, where the Bilbao-based company has become a market leader in both O&M services, with 1.9 GW, and with regard to the number of installed PV inverters and wind power converters.Ingeteam last year opened a new subsidiary in Panama, where the company was already working on the country’s first wind farm – reportedly the largest in Central America — carrying out O&M work on the wind turbines and substation. It is now overseeing O&M services for a PV plant in Veraguas, located in northern Panama.With the entry of Ingeteam Service into Uruguay and Honduras, which have made major commitment to renewable energy use, the company said it was now strategically positioned in the renewable energies sector, offering an integrated maintenance service to the market with the possibility of offering global solutions to its customers. It will now handle O&M services for PV plants in Cholueta, Honduras, and Salto, Uruguay. Ingeteam has likewise supplied protection and control equipment for substations at wind and PV farms in both countries. In Uruguay, it has also worked with the state-owned UTE power company since 2004.Popular content The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… Enabling aluminum in batteries Mark Hutchins 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Scientists in South Korea and the UK demonstrated a new cathode material for an aluminum-ion battery, which achieved impressive results in both speci… ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German engineering association VDMA. The re… Solar park built on rough wooden structures comes online in France Gwénaëlle Deboutte 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com French company Céléwatt energized its 250 kW ground-mounted array, built with mounting structures made of raw oak wood.April 26, 2021 Gwénaëlle Debo… Spanish developer plans 1 GW solar plant coupled to 80 MW of storage, 100 MW electrolyzer Pilar Sánchez Molina 22 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Soto Solar has submitted the project proposal to the Ecological Transition and the Demographic Challenge (Miteco). The solar plant could start produc… We all trust the PV performance ratio test Dario Brivio, Partner 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The performance ratio test is at the core of the handover from EPC to owner. Yet sometimes, even when best practice is applied – and without particul… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Origin Energy wants to build a hy… 123456Share pv magazine The pv magazine editorial team includes specialists in equipment supply, manufacturing, policy, markets, balance of systems, and EPC.More articles from pv magazine Related content ITRPV: Large formats are here to stay Mark Hutchins 29 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The 2021 edition of the International Technology Roadmap for Photovoltaics (ITRPV) was published today by German enginee… The Hydrogen Stream: 20 MW green hydrogen plant in Finland, two Australian projects move forward Sergio Matalucci 20 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Storegga, Shell and Harbour Energy want to set up a 20 MW blue hydrogen production facility in the U.K. Australia’s Orig… Higher performance with bigger modules a ‘no brainer’ Sandra Enkhardt 26 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Jan Bicker, who replaced Steve O’Neil as the CEO of REC on March 1, says that one of his top priorities is the ongoing d… SEIA releases tool aimed at increasing solar supply chain transparency David Wagman 30 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The document is written to have “universal application” across product lines intended for export to the U.S. market, and… Optimization algorithm for vertical agrivoltaics Emiliano Bellini 30 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Developed by Swedish scientists, the proposed algorithm is said to calculate a project’s ideal design by combining clima… The weekend read: PV feed in, certified pv magazine 1 May 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. iAbout these recommendations Elsewhere on pv magazine… Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… MIBEL alcanzó nuevamente los precios más bajos de Europa mientras subieron en el resto de mercados eléctricos pv magazine 23 March 2021 pv-magazine.es En la tercera semana de marzo los precios de la mayoría de mercados eléctricos europeos subieron, mientras que MIBEL mar… Tasmanian Labor installs solar at the top of its campaign promises Blake Matich 8 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Tasmania (TAS) is going to the polls on May 1, and the opposition Labor Party has put forth a $20 million plan to fund l… India closing in on 7 GW of rooftop solar pv magazine 13 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com India’s cumulative installed capacity of rooftop solar stood at 6,792 MW as of December 31, 2020, with 1,352 MW having b… Spotlight on Australian solar Bella Peacock 21 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Calculating the average sunlight hours data from the Bureau of Meteorology from January toDecember 2020, Darwin was cro… Q&A: EEW’s $500 million Gladstone solar to hydrogen project is just the start Blake Matich 18 March 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com pv magazine Australia: Australia is the testing ground for a lot of different aspects of the future green hydrogen market. Cracking the case for solid state batteries pv magazine 29 April 2021 pv-magazine-australia.com Scientists in the UK used the latest imaging techniques to visualize and understand the process of dendrite formation an… 123456Leave a Reply Cancel replyPlease be mindful of our community standards.Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *CommentName * Email * Website Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. By submitting this form you agree to pv magazine using your data for the purposes of publishing your comment.Your personal data will only be disclosed or otherwise transmitted to third parties for the purposes of spam filtering or if this is necessary for technical maintenance of the website. 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Select one or more editions for targeted, up to date information delivered straight to your inbox.Email* Select Edition(s)*Hold Ctrl or Cmd to select multiple editions.Tap to select multiple editions.Global (English, daily)Germany (German, daily)U.S. (English, daily)Australia (English, daily)China (Chinese, weekly)India (English, daily)Latin America (Spanish, daily)Brazil (Portuguese, weekly)Mexico (Spanish, daily)Spain (Spanish, daily)France (French, daily)We send newsletters with the approximate frequency outlined for each edition above, with occasional additional notifications about events and webinars. We measure how often our emails are opened, and which links our readers click. To provide a secure and reliable service, we send our email with MailChimp, which means we store email addresses and analytical data on their servers. You can opt out of our newsletters at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of every mail. For more information please see our Data Protection Policy. Subscribe to our global magazine SubscribeOur events and webinars Out with the old… A guide to successful inverter replacement , pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsRoberto Arana-Gonzalez, Service Sales Manager EMEA, SungrowFranco Marino, Regional Service Mana… Grid code compliance in megawatt projects 27 April 2021 pv-magazine.com Discussion participantsEhsan Nadeem Khan, Grid Code Compliance Engineer, meteocontrolModeratorsMarian Willuhn, Editor… Virtual Roundtables USA 17 November 2020 pv-magazine.com We will be hosting the second edition of our successful Virtual Roundtables this year in November. The program will be f… iAbout these recommendations pv magazine print When quality meets quantity Jonathan Gifford 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As 2021 progresses, the signs of it being (yet another) banner year for PV deployment become clearer. An increasing numb… PV feed in, certified pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As more renewable energy capacity is built, commissioned, and connected, grid stability concerns are driving rapid regulatory changes. The feasibility of India’s auctions Uma Gupta 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com The offtaker’s creditworthiness, the ease of land acquisition, infrastructure readiness, policy consistency and clarity,… Flexible tools for the next generation Jonathan Gifford 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com A solar manufacturing investment cycle appears to be underway in Europe, with equipment suppliers reporting surging leve… pv magazine test: February 2021 results pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com We are pleased to report on the next batch of energy yield results from the outdoor test field in Xi’an, China. We prese… Polysilicon from Xinjiang: a balanced view pv magazine 7 April 2021 pv-magazine.com As of March, the United States and Europe were considering sanctions on polysilicon from Xinjiang, China, due to concerns over forced labor. iAbout these recommendationslast_img read more

Woman found dead in trash compactor at posh New York City condo building

first_imgGoogle Maps(NEW YORK) — An employee at a ritzy, 29-story condominium tower in Manhattan stumbled across a gruesome discovery on Tuesday.According to the New York Police Department, the building employee found a woman stuffed in a trash compactor in the complex Tuesday at about 5 p.m.Police said the woman was unconscious and unresponsive and pronounced dead at the scene.The building is known as Zeckendorf Towers, and is located at 1 Irving Place.There were few details offered by police, just that she was 48 years old, a resident of the building and an investigation is underway.“They had the barricades up around the entrance, and I have never seen 20 detectives wandering around, anywhere, so it had to be some serious thing with suspicious circumstances, because why else would 20 detectives show up?” one resident of the building told New York ABC station WABC.Police are reviewing surveillance video from inside and outside the condo building, WABC reported.The building in the Gramercy section of Manhattan rents studios for about $3,000 a month, according to Street Easy, while the cheapest unit on sale is a studio for $995,000. A two-bedroom, two-bath condo with cost you $3.25 million.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more