Cold Weather Electric Car Tips From General Motors

first_img Chevy Bolt EV Survey Hints At Cold Weather Package With Heat Pump Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla Model 3 Cold Weather Driving Tips & Tricks Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on November 16, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News See How Cold Weather Impacts Tesla Model 3 The email came via Chevrolet’s Katie Minter, who’s an assistant manager at one of our local Chevrolet dealerships. She begins by saying she knows we’re well aware of the issues regarding electric vehicles in cold weather. Most importantly, she stresses that when temperatures drop, extra energy is needed. This energy is required to heat the car, the cabin, the battery, etc. Hence, less range. Seems obvious, right?While we know this, and the vast majority of our seasoned readers are aware, Minter reiterated something that we constantly share. Our job as EV owners is to help educate others and push adoption. We’ve had some complaints lately when we’ve published more elementary posts that are geared for EV education. Yes, we know that our direct audience is well aware of this stuff. But, if only our direct audience supports and understands EVs, we’re not doing our job. At any rate, Minter shared the following information:Electric Vehicle Cold Weather Tips from ChevroletSmart Cabin Heating: Precondition while plugged in, and take advantage of the power of the grid to heat the cabin and the battery prior to driving. Using energy from the grid to warm the cabin allows you to reserve stored battery energy for driving. Using a 240V charger provides the maximum benefit.Keeping Warm on the Road: If equipped, use the heated seats and heated steering wheel to keep warm instead of the heater. It takes less of the vehicle’s energy to heat your body through the seat than heating the entire cabin.Tire Pressure makes a Difference: As the outside temperature drops, so does the air pressure in your tires. Check the pressure in all four tires and add more air if needed. Check the tire pressure in the morning when the tires are cold. Properly inflated tires can help improve electric range and fuel economy.We’re confident you have a much longer list to share. Please, help us get this information in front on new EV adopters. Add your knowledge to the comment section below. More education for EV owners relate to cold weather.As winter sets in, there’s lots of talk about EVs and cold weather. For this reason, we’ve ramped up our coverage of the topic as of late. It seems General Motors took notice, as Chevrolet sent me an email outlining some electric vehicle cold weather tips.Other Cold Weather Related EV Content:last_img read more

Chris LaFollette The No 1 Texas MA Dealmaker in 2015

first_imgThe corporate partner at Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld led the most mergers, acquisitions, joint ventures or divestitures than any other lawyer in the Lone Star State in 2015, according to new data from The Texas Lawbook’s Corporate Deal Tracker . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Password Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook. Remember mecenter_img Username Lost your password?last_img

Texas Supreme Court to Decide Fair Report Privilege in Closely Watched Libel

first_img Remember me Major news organizations want the Supreme Court of Texas to maintain strong libel defense protections for journalists who report on government investigations. The media outlets, including The Dallas Morning News and the Houston Chronicle, say journalists should be able to report on factual information obtained from government reports or official proceedings without fear of being sued for failure to include information not contained in the report and unknown to them . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Lost your password? Usernamecenter_img Password Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img read more

Corp Deal Tracker Weekly Round Up Six Transactions 37 Texas Lawyers 2B

first_img Password Lost your password? It was slim pickings in M&A and securities work by Texas lawyers this past week, with only six transactions reported involving 36 attorneys in-state and $2 billion in value. The Texas Lawbook has the details here . . .You must be a subscriber to The Texas Lawbook to access this content. Usernamecenter_img Remember me Not a subscriber? Sign up for The Texas Lawbook.last_img

Help I Cant Remember How to Play

first_imgby, Kavan Peterson, Editor, ChangingAging.orgTweet9Share48Share1Email58 ShareshI enjoy reporting on issues related to changing aging and elderhood but sometimes feel insecure about voicing an opinion on a stage of life I haven’t actually experienced. Like many readers I’ve cared for and lost beloved family members and am deeply involved in the culture change movement in long term care… but I when it comes to actually understanding life after adulthood, what do I know?I’ll tell you this much — I know enough about living in the clutches of our culture’s cult of adulthood that I cannot freaking wait to outgrow it and become old. For those unfamiliar with Dr. Bill’s theory on the “cult of adulthood”, I’ll give you a simple, personal example. As an adult in our society, I feel I’ve completely lost the ability to “play”.This goes to the heart of the intrinsic difference between “doing” and “being”. Children live in a constant state of “being” — of truly living in the moment. Playing is one of the purest forms of being. As they grow older, they learn (and society pushes them at an increasingly younger age) the importance of “doing” rather than “being”. Organized activities, competitive sports and standards-based education all emphasize doing over being and are intended to prepare children for adulthood, the ultimate state of “doing”.Sure, adults need to “do” stuff to pay the bills. But there are incredible benefits to being and playing that we neglect. Playing is critical to fostering creativity and learning — at any age. Playing connects us to others and builds our relationships. Playing cures boredom, loneliness and depression (where have I heard that before?) and in general makes us happy. Playing relieves stress, cures emotional wounds and makes us more healthy.But to really “play” you must stop “doing” productive stuff. Ironically, wasting time has never been more valuable.I am told by elders — and the research strongly backs them up — that one of the greatest gifts of older age is an ability to spend more time “being” rather than “doing”. It is said — and again, all research backs it up — that elders are especially connected to and good with children because they are able to “be” with them in a way that adults find difficult.So, while I don’t personally know what it’s like to be an elder I sure as hell know what it’s like to be an adult and I can say this with authority — I don’t know how to stop “doing” and just “be”. I am painfully reminded of this every single day by my two children, ages five and nine months. In particular, I’ve experienced few things in my life more difficult than the daily transition from “doing” my work to playing make-believe with my five-year-old.I’m proud to brag that my daughter is highly imaginative and extremely playful. But it is excruciating for me to ignore my phone and stop my brain from churning on matters of business when I’m supposed to be playing My Little Ponies with her. The sad truth is this isn’t a new revelation — I’ve been aware of this problem for several years. And I’ve been trying to intentionally improve my ability to “be” through the (irregular) practice of mindfulness meditation.I’m sure every single person who has had the misfortune of being an adult can relate to my dilemma. I felt like I was making progress via my mindfulness meditation practice, but since my second child arrived nine months ago it has just been impossible to find time for it. There’s a great Buddhist saying, “meditate every day for 30 minutes. If you don’t have enough time for that then mediate for an hour.” Maybe I’ll do that after finishing this blog post (and answering emails, and checking Twitter, and doing a webinar and returning phone calls and making some lunch and changing the laundry and picking up my daughter from Kindergarten — whoops, times up!). In the meantime, can I get some help? Can any readers recommend any good books or resources to teach a wretched adult how to play again?[Editors note: This blog post is an example of our new section Journeys dedicated to stories about navigating life’s passages. Do you have a Journey to share? Submit a guestblog here.]Related Posts#TEDxSF: We Are All Elders in the MakingHere’s the final point I want to make in my TEDxSF talk. We all know that childhood and the coming-of-age in adolescence play an important cultural function in preparing us for adulthood. But what is adulthood for?The EnthusiastsA website that bills itself as having the “biggest little list” of oxymorons on the internet offers all of the usual suspects including “enormously small,” a “genuine fake,” and “paid volunteer.” It also reveals our culture’s bias against aging. We find “active retirement,” a “young sixty” and “healthy aging” listed…TEDxSF: The Cult of the AdulthoodIn preparation for my TED talk at this Saturday’s TEDxSF Alive! Maximum Living as a Human conference in San Francisco, I’ve shared my ideas on the fundamental flaw in how contemporary American culture has designed the human life cycle. ChangingAging readers are familiar with my characterization of this problem as…Tweet9Share48Share1Email58 SharesTags: adulthood cult of adulthood mindfulness Playlast_img read more

The Benefits of an Umbrella Insurance Policy

first_imgThe Benefits of an Umbrella Insurance PolicyNovember 30, 2018 By Administrator Anyone who wishes to protect themselves from major claims or lawsuits, or would like to protect their assets or earnings would benefit from an umbrella insurance policy. Insuring your future is what an umbrella insurance policy can help with by safeguarding your future earnings, your home or cash savings.When Would I Use My Umbrella Insurance Policy? A personal umbrella insurance policy covers you when your auto, home or other personal lines insurance policy is exhausted by a covered insurance claim.Example: You get into a car accident where you are at fault. Your insurance policy covers you for $250,000 in 3rd party damages. However, the other individuals in the car accident needed medical attention & their car was totaled. The total damages for the other party cost $350,000.You are responsible for the remaining $100,000. If you have an umbrella insurance policy, it would then kick in to cover this excess liability. If you don’t have an umbrella policy, would you be able to foot the bill? If you cannot pay for the remaining balance, a court may issue your future wages to be garnished. Similarly, homeowners need to protect themselves from a liability claim. Whether you’re hosting a party and serve too much alcohol, have a slip and fall accident on your sidewalk or your dog bites a neighbor, you can be held liable for medical bills, rehabilitation programs and lost wages.How are you covered?By purchasing an umbrella policy, you can be covered for the following items:Bodily injury: Medical bills and settlement for injuries sustained to the third party.Property damage: Damages sustained to the property of a third-party.Other damage: Libel & slander, other claims expenses.Legal fees: Hiring an attorney can be expensive. An umbrella insurance policy helps cover the cost.There are countless situations that can occur and exhaust your current liability limits on your home or auto insurance policy. Good news: umbrella insurance policies are relatively inexpensive, typically starting around $155 per year. Contact an agent at our office for your personalized umbrella insurance quote today. We can help you determine how much coverage you need.Filed Under: Bloglast_img read more

Increasing biodefense risks posed by synthetic biology

first_img Source:National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Biodefense in the Age of Synthetic Biology. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/24890. https://www.nap.edu/catalog/24890/biodefense-in-the-age-of-synthetic-biology Gigi Gronvall, a public health researcher at Johns Hopkins and a co-author of the report says that the risk expands when synthetic biology comes into play. This report, Gronvall says, is a framework that could evaluate the extent of risk posed by these tools and their misuse. Earlier in 2016 the US intelligence community had mentioned gene editing as one of the potential biological weapons of mass destruction. D. Christian Hassell, deputy assistant secretary of defense for chemical and biological defense, who was part of this new report explains that there are quite a few varied opinions regarding this from experts. This report, he said, was commissioned to gather all the opinions from the experts in one place. He added that at present the military does not view “synbio” as a major threat but is gearing up to prepare for this because soon it may pose a threat. Vaccines for example, against biological weapons such as altered viruses may take time to develop and early preparation is warranted.Related StoriesResearch opens possibility of developing single-dose gene therapy for inherited arrhythmiasGene modulation goes wireless hacking the “boss gene”Nanoparticles used to deliver CRISPR gene editing tools into the cellThe report outlines what could be done when synbio techniques are applied and the likelihood of populations that could be affected. Recreation and alteration of deadly viruses using genetic engineering is viewed as the greatest potential threat. Altering and making deadly bacteria more dangerous and resistant to treatment, creating harmful biochemicals at site of attack or within the body, altering human genome, altering human healthy bacterial microbiome, altering human immune systems, creating new pathogenic organisms are some of the concerns that have been expressed in the report. While some of these are of “highest concern”, some including creating new pathogenic organisms are of “lower concern” at the moment. The report says that some of these may appear to be too fantastic but with rapid advances in gene editing tools like CRISPR, it could not be entirely impossible. CRISPR could be used to modify human genomes to cause several diseases including cancer.One of the scenarios in this report is when a terrorist group wants to use these altered and engineered viruses to different parts of the world and attempt to create a pandemic. The results could be deaths of over 150 million people within a year before a suitable vaccine could be made to fight the bio-weapon. The scenario showed that the response of the populations to the epidemic of an altered microbe would be similar to that when a natural pandemic such as influenza occurs.The report was commissioned by the US military which itself remains one of the largest sponsors of synbio technologies. Experts believe that reports such as these could also trigger a “bio-weapons race” among nations. They explain that governments should keep a close eye on what is being achieved in this field just like they did on advances in physics and chemistry developing weapons of mass destruction during the Cold War times.The report says that those very tools that could create these bio-weapons could be used to make effective and better vaccines and medicines to fight the synbio weapons. The techniques could be used to make diagnosis of these infections easy and improve disease surveillance and quarantine to prevent its spread. By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDJun 19 2018A US Department of Defense commissioned study has found that there are several genetic-engineering tools that could be used to devise biological weapons in a short amount of time.The extensive 221 page report says that tools itself could appear harmless and they could be put to good use such as creating genetically engineered disease-resistant plants or make genetically engineered personalized medicines etc. However several labs and companies are working towards making “synthetic-biology-enabled weapons.”This latest report authored by 13 experts in the field, comes from the National Academies of Sciences and is the first that outlines national security threats from biological weapons using genetic engineering tools such as gene editing tool CRISPR. The report is titled, “Biodefense in the Age of Synthetic Biology” and was published yesterday.center_img CRISPR/Cas9 system for editing, regulating and targeting genomes. The Cas9 protein uses a gRNA (guide RNA) sequence to cut DNA at a complementary site. Molecular structure – RNA in red, DNA in yellow. Image Credit: ibreakstock / Shutterstocklast_img read more

Brains attention network plays key role in vision restoration after stroke trauma

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 4 2018New study highlights the role of attention as a component of vision restoration training in hemianopiaAbout one third of patients who have suffered a stroke end up with low vision, losing up to half of their visual field. This partial blindness was long considered irreversible, but recent studies have shown that vision training after optic nerve and brain damage can help restore or improve vision. A new study published in the journal Clinical Neurophysiology reports on key mechanisms of vision restoration: attention.Hemianopia is a decreased vision or blindness in half the visual field, usually as a consequence of stroke or trauma to the brain. It greatly reduces quality of life, affecting patients’ reading, driving and spatial navigation.”Knowledge in this field is still rather fragmentary, but recent studies have shown that vision can be partially restored by vision training, which improves the deficient visual field sectors,” explains Prof. Bernhard Sabel, PhD, Director of the Institute of Medical Psychology at Magdeburg University, Germany, co-investigator of the study. “Neuroimaging evidence supports a possible role of attention in this vision restoration.”The study confirmed this hypothesis by obtaining evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) that visual training led to functional connectivity reorganization of the brain´s attentional network.Seven chronic hemianopic patients with lesions of the visual cortex took part in vision rehabilitation training for five weeks. After the pre-tests all received training sessions lasting one and a half hours per day for six days per week for five weeks. Each training session, lasting about 60 minutes, was composed of six blocks with 120 training trials each, during which participants had to respond to specially designed visual stimuli on a computer monitor. The pre- and post-test included perimetry testing, contrast sensitivity testing and fMRI scanning one or two days before and after training, respectively. Each contrast sensitivity test consisted of 420 trials in six blocks. The visual rehabilitation training was performed with one eye open, which was randomly chosen, while the non-trained eye was covered with an opaque eye patch.Related StoriesRepurposing a heart drug could increase survival rate of children with ependymomaStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with agingResearchers measure EEG-based brain responses for non-speech and speech sounds in childrenAfter training, the patients had significantly improved visual function at the training location, and fMRI showed that the training led to a strengthening of the cortical attentional network connections between the brain region of the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) and the insula and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC).”Our MRI results highlight the role of attention and the right TPJ activation as a component of vision restoration training in hemianopia,” notes lead investigator Yifeng Zhou, DSc, of the Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Science, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, P.R. China, and State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, P.R. China. “However, it is unclear whether the rehabilitation of attentional networks is the direct result of training or the result of the rebalancing of bottom-up sensory streams, which should be investigated in future studies.””This discovery that the brain´s attention network is a key mechanism in partially reversing blindness is an exciting advance in the field of restoring vision in the blind, and it opens up new avenues to design new therapies that are even more effective than current methods to help people with low vision or blindness,” concludes Prof. Sabel.Source: http://www.imp.ovgu.de/en/last_img read more

Alzheimers diagnosis might become simpler with new brain imaging method

first_img Source:https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2702872 There are two forms of proteins deposits in the brain in patients with Alzheimer’s disease – the tau protein that forms tangles in the brain and the beta amyloid protein that causes plaque formation within the brain. The beta amyloid protein spreads across the brain first and the tau protein spreads at a later stage from the temporal lobes of the brain to other parts. Senior researcher Rik Ossenkoppele, Lund University and Amsterdam University Medical Center explained that the first symptoms and problems begin to appear in the patient when the tau starts to spread and the neurons or brain cells begin to die. Memory difficulties are detected and at that time there is increased tau in the brain Ossenkoppele said and this clinches the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s.Related StoriesMathematical model helps quantify metastatic cell behaviorDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaThe team including those from Lund-Malmö in southern Sweden as well as others from San Francisco and Seoul studied over 700 patients and looked at memory tests of these patients. They performed PET scans on the brains of these patients and detected tau presence in the brain. PET scans use radioactive markers that light up the desired areas. Oskar Hansson explained that they used specific “tau markers” that were administered intravenously. On scanning the Alzheimer tau presence or absence was clearly detected.The researchers explain that this new tau-PET method was capable of detecting 90-95 per cent of all cases of Alzheimer’s disease and gave only a few false positive results. This proved its superiority over other methods such as MRI. Beta-amyloid PET is also being used these days for diagnosis and tau-PET method showed fewer false positive results than even the beta-amyloid PET method state the authors of the study.Hansson said, “If you are found to have tau in the brain according to tau-PET, it is, with few exceptions, due to Alzheimer’s disease. If you have normal tau-PET and mild to moderate dementia, your memory problems are most likely due to other neurological diseases.” Early diagnosis can help initiate medication therapy earlier say the experts. This method would also be useful in clinical trials testing drugs to be used in Alzheimer’s to check for their effectiveness. By Dr. Ananya Mandal, MDSep 20 2018Accurate diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease may be difficult in most patients as similar symptoms can be seen in several other disease conditions as well. Researchers have developed a new brain imaging method that can show the exact presence and distribution of the tau protein depositions in the brain of a persons with Alzheimer’s disease. These tau protein deposits are characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease.Oskar Hansson. Hansson, professor of clinical memory research at Lund University in Sweden and study leader said in a statement, “The method works very well. I believe it will be applied clinically all over the world in only a few years.” The study results were published in the latest issue of the JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association).center_img Alzheimer’s diagnosis might become simpler with new brain imaging method​. Image Credit: Lightspring / Shutterstocklast_img read more

New Guidelines Reinforce Value of AntiHIV Pills for Prevention

Great fanfare has accompanied the findings from several big studies over the past few years that an anti-HIV pill a day can keep the virus away. Interim guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease and Prevention have backed the approach, known as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), for people at high risk of becoming infected, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration also approved the strategy in 2012. But PrEP has not had much traction with young gay men, one of the highest at-risk groups in the United States and elsewhere. And the number of new infections per year in the United States stubbornly has remained at about 50,000 people for more than a decade.Now, the U.S. Public Health Service has issued finalized clinical guidelines that it hopes will lead to much more widespread use of PrEP, much in the same way that many take statins to reduce the risk of heart disease. The guidelines recommend daily use of the drug Truvada—which combines two antiretrovirals—for sexually active men who have sex with men, heterosexuals “at substantial risk” of infection” (including those who have an HIV-infected partner), and people who inject drugs. Although daily Truvada doses cost about $13,000 per year, insurance plans typically cover the expense. The company that manufactures Truvada, Gilead Sciences Inc. of Foster City, California, also assists uninsured people. read more

Artificial intelligence learns to spot pain in sheep

first_img By Matthew HutsonJun. 1, 2017 , 2:30 PM Artificial intelligence learns to spot pain in sheep The life of a sheep is not as cushy as it looks. They suffer injury and infection, and can’t tell their human handlers when they’re in pain. Recently, veterinarians have developed a protocol for estimating the pain a sheep is in from its facial expressions, but humans apply it inconsistently, and manual ratings are time-consuming. Computer scientists at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom have stepped in to automate the task. They started by listing several “facial action units” (AUs) associated with different levels of pain, drawing on the Sheep Pain Facial Expression Scale. They manually labeled these AUs—nostril deformation, rotation of each ear, and narrowing of each eye—in 480 photos of sheep. Then they trained a machine-learning algorithm by feeding it 90% of the photos and their labels, and tested the algorithm on the remaining 10%. The program’s average accuracy at identifying the AUs was 67%, about as accurate as the average human, the researchers will report today at the IEEE International Conference on Automatic Face and Gesture Recognition in Washington, D.C. Ears were the most telling cue. Refining the training procedure further boosted accuracy. Given additional labeled images, the scientists expect their method would also work with other animals. Better diagnosis of pain could lead to quicker treatment.last_img read more

Robotlaunched weather balloons in Alaska hasten demise of remote stations

first_img Last Thursday, just before 3 p.m., things began stirring inside the truck-size box that sat among melting piles of snow at the airport in Fairbanks, Alaska. Inside, software ran checks on instruments to measure atmospheric temperature, humidity, and pressure; a tray slid into place; and a nozzle began filling a large balloon with gas. Finally, the roof of the box yawned open and a weather balloon took off into the sunny afternoon, instruments dangling. The entire launch was triggered with the touch of a button, 5 kilometers away at an office of the National Weather Service (NWS).The flight was smooth, just one of hundreds of twice-daily balloon launches around the world that radio back crucial data for weather forecasts. But most of those balloons are launched by people; the robotic launchers, which are rolling out across Alaska, are proving to be controversial. NWS says the autolaunchers will save money and free up staff to work on more pressing matters. But representatives of the employee union question their reliability, and say they will hasten the end of Alaska’s remote weather offices, where forecasting duties and hours have already been slashed. “The autolauncher is just another nail in their coffin,” says Kimberly Vaughan, a union steward in Juneau.Autolaunchers have operated around the world for decades, but NWS has just begun to use them. Its demonstration project in Alaska began last October, in Kodiak. Fairbanks is the second site to get one, and the agency will install them at 11 other locations, ending with Nome in 2020, says Susan Buchanan, an NWS spokesperson in Silver Spring, Maryland. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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The machines need reloading every 12 days. By Julia RosenApr. 25, 2018 , 12:25 PM Margaret Mooney, a former NWS meteorologist who is now the director for education and public outreach at the University of Wisconsin’s Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies in Madison, says automation makes sense. “I remember walking outside at 3 a.m. when the temperature was 20 below zero, thinking there must be a better way to do weather observations, and sure enough, there is,” she says. Moreover, she adds, measurements from Alaska are indispensable for national forecasts because they are “upstream for most of the United States.”Once deployed across the state, the $1.2 million machines, built by Finnish company Vaisala, will save about 8 hours of forecaster time a day—and about $1 million a year at NWS, Buchanan says. That’s because the agency tries to staff each remote site with three people, but job vacancies mean overworked employees are shuffled around the vast state to keep up. “We have a difficult time recruiting people to go to these locations,” Buchanan says. Recently, some stations have skipped scheduled launches.Now, Buchanan says, NWS will need just one person at each remote site, to serve as a community liaison and to reload the autolauncher every 12 days. The other staff will relocate to bigger offices, like the ones in Anchorage or Fairbanks, where they can retrain for missions such as forecasting sea ice conditions and volcanic ash hazards, she says. The agency also plans to scale back office space and housing at the remote sites.Vaughan argues, however, that the plan perpetuates a loss of local knowledge and jobs, adding that the vacancy problem is self-inflicted. She says few people want to work at the remote stations because the remaining positions are temporary and low-paying. She also worries that the machines could malfunction and, without human backups, miss launches.Dan Sobien, president of the Washington, D.C.–based NWS Employees Organization, fears that if autolaunchers spread to other states, they could help pave the way for further consolidation. He says slow hiring has left roughly 560 positions unfilled nationwide, and he suspects the technology may factor into potential plans to reduce hours and duties at some of NWS’s 122 forecasting offices. “In order to do that, they can’t have people in there launching balloons,” Sobien says.Buchanan says NWS has funding for only eight autolaunchers outside of Alaska, and that talk of proliferation is premature. But President Donald Trump’s administration has called for cutting 355 additional positions from NWS in its 2019 budget proposal for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which oversees NWS, and it wants to improve the agency’s flexibility and efficiency. “Technology and better business practices at the weather service will allow us to absorb the reductions in people in this budget,” acting NOAA Administrator Tim Gallaudet said in Washington, D.C., at an 11 April congressional budget hearing.center_img NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Robot-launched weather balloons in Alaska hasten demise of remote stationslast_img read more

Megalibraries of nanomaterials could speed clean energy and other grand challenge targets

first_img Email Lightweight armors, synthetic fuels, and new high-efficiency solar cells could all be the outcome of a new high-speed technique for discovering advanced materials made from ultrasmall flecks of matter.In the materials world, size matters. Particularly on the smallest length scales of just billionths of a meter, or nanometers. Nanomaterials are famous for having different optical, electrical, and catalytic properties than bulk chunks of the exact same stuff. But that makes exploring the endless possible combinations of multiple elements of different nanoscale sizes a near impossibility.Now, there’s help. Researchers have come up with a high-speed approach to make “megalibraries” of up to 5 billion combinations of different nanomaterials that vary in a controlled manner, based on the concentration of different elements they contain and the sizes of the resulting particles. To make the arrays, the team used a specialized device that contains hundreds of thousands of pyramid-shaped tips to stamp individual polymer wells of various sizes and composition, each loaded with different metal salts of interest. The stamped surface is then heated, burning away the polymer and causing the metals to form alloy particles. E. Kluender et al., PNAS 10.1073 (2018) Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe ‘Megalibraries’ of nanomaterials could speed clean energy and other grand challenge targets By Robert F. ServiceDec. 20, 2018 , 5:35 PM The scientists tested one such array, pictured above, and discovered a new catalyst able to make straw-shaped carbon nanotubes—prized for their ultrahigh strength and ability to serve as tiny high-speed transistors—faster than any catalyst previously discovered, as they report this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The discoveries aren’t likely to stop there, as the researchers plan to test myriad other nanomaterials in search of new and improved catalysts, electronic, and optical materials.last_img read more

New climate models predict a warming surge

first_img Matt King/Stringer/GETTY IMAGES Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Many scientists are skeptical, pointing out that past climate changes recorded in ice cores and elsewhere don’t support the high climate sensitivity—nor does the pace of modern warming. The results so far are “not sufficient to convince me,” says Kate Marvel, a climate scientist at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York City. In the effort to account for atmospheric components that are too small to directly simulate, like clouds, the new models could easily have strayed from reality, she says. “That’s always going to be a bumpy road.”Builders of the new models agree. Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) in Princeton, New Jersey—the birthplace of climate modeling—incorporated a host of improvements in their next-generation model. It mimics the ocean in fine enough detail to directly simulate eddies, honing its representation of heat-carrying currents like the Gulf Stream. Its rendering of the El Niño cycle, the periodic warming of the equatorial Pacific Ocean, looks “dead on,” says Michael Winton, a GFDL oceanographer who helped lead the model’s development. But for some reason, the world warms up faster with these improvements. Why? “We’re kind of mystified,” Winton says. Right now, he says, the model’s equilibrium sensitivity looks to be 5°C.Developers of another next-generation model, from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado, wonder whether their new rendering of clouds and aerosols might explain why it, too, is running hot, with a sensitivity in the low fives. The NCAR team, like other modelers, has had persistent problems in simulating the supercooled water found in clouds that form above the Southern Ocean around Antarctica. The clouds weren’t reflective enough, allowing the region to absorb too much sunlight. The new version fixes that problem.Late in the model’s development cycle, however, the NCAR group incorporated an updated data set on emissions of aerosols, fine particles from industry and natural processes that can both reflect sunlight or goose the development of clouds. The aerosol data threw everything off—when the model simulated the climate of the 20th century, it now showed hardly any warming. “It took us about a year to work that out,” says NCAR’s Andrew Gettelman, who helped lead the development of the model. But the aerosols may play a role in the higher sensitivity that the modelers now see, perhaps by affecting the thickness and extent of low ocean clouds. “We’re trying to understand if other [model developers] went through the same process,” Gettelman says.Answers may come from an ongoing exercise called the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP), a precursor to each IPCC round. In it, modelers run a standard set of simulations, such as modeling the preindustrial climate and the effect of an abrupt quadrupling of atmospheric CO2 levels, and compare notes. The sixth CMIP is now at least a year late. The first draft of the next IPCC report was due in early April, yet only a handful of teams had uploaded modeling runs of future projections, says Fyfe, an author of the report’s projections chapter. “It’s maddening, because it feels like writing a sci-fi story as the first-order draft.”The ambitious scope of this CMIP is one reason for the delay. Beyond running the standard five simulations, centers can perform 23 additional modeling experiments, targeting specific science questions, such as cloud feedbacks or short-term prediction. The CMIP teams have also been asked to document their computer code more rigorously than in the past, and to make their models compatible with new evaluation tools, says Veronika Eyring, a climate modeler at the German Aerospace Center in Wessling who is co-leading this CMIP round.Such comparisons may help the modelers respond to the IPCC authors, who are peppering them with questions about the higher sensitivity, Gettelman says. “They’re asking us, what’s going on?” he says. “They’re pushing people. They’ve got about a year to figure this out.”In assessing how fast climate may change, the next IPCC report probably won’t lean as heavily on models as past reports did, says Thorsten Mauritsen, a climate scientist at Stockholm University and an IPCC author. It will look to other evidence as well, in particular a large study in preparation that will use ancient climates and observations of recent climate change to constrain sensitivity. IPCC is also not likely to give projections from all the models equal weight, Fyfe adds, instead weighing results by each model’s credibility.Even so, the model results remain disconcerting, Gettelman says. The planet is already warming faster than humans can cope with, after all. “The scary part is these models might be right,” he says. “Because that would be pretty devastating.”center_img Heat waves, like one in Australia in January, will get worse in a warming world. By Paul VoosenApr. 16, 2019 , 3:55 PM For nearly 40 years, the massive computer models used to simulate global climate have delivered a fairly consistent picture of how fast human carbon emissions might warm the world. But a host of global climate models developed for the United Nations’s next major assessment of global warming, due in 2021, are now showing a puzzling but undeniable trend. They are running hotter than they have in the past. Soon the world could be, too.In earlier models, doubling atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) over preindustrial levels led models to predict somewhere between 2°C and 4.5°C of warming once the planet came into balance. But in at least eight of the next-generation models, produced by leading centers in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and France, that “equilibrium climate sensitivity” has come in at 5°C or warmer. Modelers are struggling to identify which of their refinements explain this heightened sensitivity before the next assessment from the United Nations’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). But the trend “is definitely real. There’s no question,” says Reto Knutti, a climate scientist at ETH Zurich in Switzerland. “Is that realistic or not? At this point, we don’t know.”That’s an urgent question: If the results are to be believed, the world has even less time than was thought to limit warming to 1.5°C or 2°C above preindustrial levels—a threshold many see as too dangerous to cross. With atmospheric CO2 already at 408 parts per million (ppm) and rising, up from preindustrial levels of 280 ppm, even previous scenarios suggested the world could warm 2°C within the next few decades. The new simulations are only now being discussed at meetings, and not all the numbers are in, so “it’s a bit too early to get wound up,” says John Fyfe, a climate scientist at the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis in Victoria, whose model is among those running much hotter than in the past. “But maybe we have to face a reality in the future that’s more pessimistic than it was in the past.” New climate models predict a warming surgelast_img read more

Radical openaccess plan delayed a year as revised effort seeks more support

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country By Tania RabesandratanaMay. 30, 2019 , 7:01 PM Email Plan S, the program to crack down on scientific journals’ paywalls led by European research funders, has fleshed out and relaxed some of its rules in revised implementation guidelines published today. The update addresses many concerns raised by researchers, librarians, and scientific publishers about Plan S’s rollout, allowing more time before full, immediate open access (OA) is required and dropping the proposed cap on publishing fees that funders will pay to journals.The architects of Plan S “have engaged in a good quality dialogue” with the people and institutions that are going to deal with the plan’s consequences, says Lidia Borrell-Damián, director for research and innovation at the European University Association in Brussels. As a result, the revised guidelines seem “much more nuanced and more realistic” than the initial set, says astrophysicist Luke Drury, former president of the Royal Irish Academy in Dublin.Still unclear is whether the changes will convince other funders to join the movement. And the plan’s fiercest detractors are unmoved. “The changes are cosmetic and trivial. They more or less ignored the critique,” says Lynn Kamerlin, a structural biologist at Uppsala University in Sweden who co-authored an open letter against Plan S in November 2018 that now has about 1800 signatories. BENEDETTO CRISTOFANI/SALZMAN ART Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Launched in September 2018, Plan S is a radical proposal to mandate full and immediate OA to scientific papers stemming from research funded by cOAlition S, a group of 19 public and private funder organizations that back the plan. After 2 months of heated debate, cOAlition S released draft implementation guidelines for public scrutiny; the draft received about 600 responses—mostly from Europe, but including 75 responses from the United States and eight from Argentina.In the updated rules and guidelines, the essence of Plan S remains the same, but some technical requirements have been relaxed. The update includes a later deadline for full, immediate OA and provides clarity on ways scientists can comply with Plan S.One of the main changes is a 1-year extension: Plan S rules will now apply to calls for research proposals by cOAlition S funders starting in 2021, instead of the previously announced 2020 kickoff. Considering the time necessary to start those research projects and publish results, this means the mandate will apply to papers published starting in 2022 or 2023, John-Arne Røttingen, chief executive of the Research Council of Norway in Oslo and one of the leaders of the task force in charge of the update to Plan S rules, told journalists this week.In another big change that several critics had called for, Plan S shelved—for now—the idea of capping the amount funders will pay for article-processing charges (APCs), the fees some journals charge to publish OA articles. Instead, the funders say they will require price transparency from publishers—a breakdown of what’s behind APCs so that researchers can compare publishing venues before choosing one.“It is significant that Coalition S listened to feedback that different approaches to peer review, as part of publishing, require different APCs,” said Bill Moran, publisher of the Science family of journals in Washington, D.C. (Science’s News section is editorially independent.)Many publishers are happy to provide such transparency about their fees, says Niamh O’Connor, chair-elect of the Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers in London. “This will help us to show people what those costs are; it’s not uncommon for authors or referees to wonder about them.”Plan S funders for their part hope more transparency will allow authors to make more efficient, “evidence-based” decisions rather than choosing based on journals’ perceived reputation and quality.This is a secondary goal for cOAlition S—not only to make publishing more open, but to shake up the research assessment system. To do so, cOAlition S funders now say they will implement principles by 2021, such as those of the 2012 San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment, which states that research should be assessed on its own merit and not the journal in which it was published. The coalition’s members won’t be required to sign the declaration itself, although some of them already have.“Shifting the research assessment culture is the biggest stumbling block,” says Drury, who authored a response to the draft Plan S guidance by All European Academies, a federation of European academies of sciences and humanities. Plan S funders will need to be explicit and proactive to enact such profound change. For example, funders should back initiatives to develop new metrics so that scientists can stop relying on journals as proxies for a paper’s quality when evaluating a grant application. “They need to set a road map with a clear timeline,” says Gareth O’Neill, a linguist at Leiden University in the Netherlands and outgoing president of the European Council of Doctoral Candidates and Junior Researchers; actions could include bias training for evaluators.The revised guidelines also spell out Plan S funders’ support for the Open Access 2020 Initiative, which aims to shift money from journal subscriptions to OA publishing through “read-and-publish” deals between publishers and consortia of institutions. These agreements negotiate a price for researchers at a group of institutions or in a whole country to read and publish OA papers for an overall fee, instead of paying individual APCs and subscription costs.These often lengthy contract negotiations “are more manageable for larger publishers,” O’Connor says. cOAlition S says it will develop model contracts to help smaller publishers, in particular, scientific society journals, to enter these so-called “transformative agreements.” It will also try to help smaller publishers with a new “transformative journal” option, in which subscription journals would be compliant and eligible for Plan S funding until the end of 2024 if they commit to increasing OA content gradually, to reach 100% within an agreed time frame. This won’t work for everybody, O’Connor says, but it’s a “positive step” that Plan S now offers compliance routes for smaller publishers.The updated guidance also clarifies Plan S’s stance on hybrid journals—publications that charge subscription fees to readers as well as APCs for authors who choose to publish OA. Plan S still wants to crack down on what critics call “double-dipping,” and push journals to move to a full OA model. So the cOAlition S funders won’t pay hybrid journals’ APCs, but researchers who pay such fees from another source can be Plan S compliant as long as the final article is freely accessible online immediately after publication.Finally, Plan S’s revamped rules give more prominence to “green” OA, in which scientists post peer-reviewed papers in OA repositories. The new rules also relax the technical requirements for such repositories.On the whole, cOAlition S “really seem[s] to have listened to the research community. There are no major sticking points anymore,” O’Neill says. “Now, we’ll watch them, see what works and what doesn’t, and hold them accountable.”*Correction, May 31, 7:15 a.m.: This story was corrected to clarify Plan S rules for hybrid journals. Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Radical open-access plan delayed a year as revised effort seeks more supportlast_img read more

How Commerce Secretary Ross got the science behind the census so wrong—and

first_img iStock.com/GCShutter A decision this week by a federal court to block the U.S. government’s plan to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census is more than a political setback for Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross and President Donald Trump. It also represents a strong vote of confidence in the U.S. statistical community and the value of research.On 15 January, U.S. District Court Judge Jesse Furman of the Southern District of New York declared that Ross had been “arbitrary and capricious” in deciding last year to add the citizenship question. He also ruled that the question would most likely result in leaving millions of noncitizens and Hispanic residents out of the decennial head count.The plaintiffs in the case, some 33 state and local officials as well as numerous civil rights organizations, argued successfully that Ross had violated a federal law governing how to make changes in the census. They also convinced the judge that their jurisdictions would likely suffer politically and economically from an undercount. How Commerce Secretary Ross got the science behind the census so wrong—and why it matters Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A U.S. judge agrees with research showing households with noncitizens are much less likely to respond to the 2020 census than other demographic groups.center_img But Furman’s 277-page ruling covered far more than the legal arguments in the case. The judge also concluded that Ross has been playing fast and loose with the scientific advice he sought from staff at the Census Bureau and outside researchers before announcing his decision on 26 March 2018. At the same time, Furman went out of his way to praise the integrity and conduct of John Abowd, the bureau’s chief scientist, in his role as expert witness for the defense.In particular, Ross’s contention that adding the question would not have a more serious negative impact on the response rate of noncitizens than on other groups “is without merit,” the judge wrote. “It is based on a mischaracterization of the evidence … [and] it relies heavily on misguided criticism of the Census Bureau’s own research.”Furman’s ruling is only the first in a complex legal battle expected to end up in the Supreme Court. (Public officials and civil rights groups have made similar arguments in a trial underway in a federal court in San Francisco, California, and a third federal trial begins next week in Baltimore, Maryland.) But those other justices, if they choose, can now use Furman’s lengthy decision as a guide in weighing Ross’s claim that the Census Bureau was obliged to put a citizenship question on the 2020 census and that doing so would not undermine its quality.Going beyond motiveAs the Cabinet secretary who oversees the Census Bureau, Ross has the authority to decide what appears on the decennial census. And in his March 2018 memo, Ross said he was adding the citizen question because the Department of Justice (DOJ) had requested it to fulfill the department’s responsibility to enforce the Voting Rights Act (VRA).Furman demolished that explanation in his ruling, citing Ross’s own memos from a year earlier asking DOJ officials why they hadn’t made the case to him. “While the Court is unable to determine what Secretary Ross’ real reasons for adding the citizenship question were,” the judge wrote, “it does find … that promoting enforcement of the VRA was not his real reason.”Ross’s own testimony might have provided an answer, Furman speculated. But the Trump administration persuaded the Supreme Court to reject the plaintiffs’ request that Ross answer questions.Ross’s state of mind was never the central issue for demographers and population statisticians opposed to his decision. Instead, they hoped the court might clear up what many regarded as his convoluted or deliberately misleading technical arguments in the 2018 decision memo. In particular, Ross asserted that he had been told “no empirical evidence existed on the impact of a citizenship question on responses” and that there was “limited empirical evidence … [it] would decrease response rates materially.” Ross also claimed that the citizenship question “has been well-tested.”Furman ruled that none of those claims are valid—and, implicitly, that Ross could have known they were wrong if he had bothered to read memos written by his own staff or consulted the literature. “Plaintiffs have proved that the addition of a citizenship question will cause [a net differential undercount] with respect to noncitizen and Hispanic households,” the judge wrote. “Plaintiffs have also proved the likely amount of the decline.”Fieldwork isn’t the answerFurman also slapped down the government’s contention that the bureau’s procedures for what it calls nonresponse follow-up (NRFU)—tracking down people in households that don’t respond to an initial request to fill out the census form—could remedy any initial undercount and make sure that noncitizens were properly represented in the final tally.“It is impossible to accept Defendants’ interpretation of the facts,” Furman wrote. “In the face of strong evidence that the citizenship question will cause a differential decline in self-response rates among noncitizen households, Defendants demand that Plaintiffs rebut their unsupported assurances that the Census Bureau will figure out a way to fix the problem, even though it has never done so before.” Indeed, Furman said, “the evidence demonstrates that each of NRFU’s step will replicate or exacerbate the effects of the net differential decline in self-response rates among noncitizen households.”In explaining why the problem is so intractable, Furman explored the intricacies of NRFU, some of which may not even be familiar to researchers. For example, the census doesn’t return to an address from which it has received a response, even if the person filling out the census failed to report on everyone living there.That’s important to this case, Furman reasoned, because homeowners may be more inclined to hide any noncitizens living with them. “The evidence shows that noncitizens and Hispanics are both disproportionately likely to be omitted from self-responses in this way,” he wrote, “particularly if the citizenship question is added to the census.”  Other components of the NRFU process are similarly flawed, Furman noted. Asking a proxy for information—such as a postal carrier or school bus driver who knows the neighborhood—is less likely to yield information on a noncitizen, researchers have found. In addition, the pool of households used for imputation—filling in the blanks of a nonrespondent with the characteristics of a peer—disproportionately lacks noncitizens.That’s also true when tapping administrative records, information on individuals that the Census Bureau obtains from other federal agencies. “The Census Bureau expects that … enumeration using administrative records will be less successful for noncitizens than citizens,” the judge wrote in voicing skepticism about one method that Ross has claimed can fill any gaps.No second chancesFurman was aware he had taken a deep dive into an arcane topic. “The Court’s opinion is, to put it mildly, long,” he wrote in a wry note. But he’s otherwise unapologetic.“The integrity of the census is a matter of national importance,” his ruling declared. “The population count has massive and lasting consequences. And it occurs only once a decade, with no possibility of a do-over if it turns out to be flawed.”Correction, 18 January 2019, 10:50 a.m.: The fifth paragraph of the story has been revised to make clear that the judge was referring to an assertion by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, not the Census Bureau. Email Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) By Jeffrey MervisJan. 17, 2019 , 3:25 PMlast_img read more

Bangalore news July 16 highlights SC reserves order on Rebel MLAs case

first_img Will respond after SC verdict tomorrow: Speaker Ramesh Kumar Karnataka legislative assembly speaker KR Ramesh Kumar told reporters in Kolar on Tuesday that he will respond to the issue – of 15 MLAs moving the Supreme Court alleging that the Speaker delayed accepting their resignations – after the SC verdict is out on Wednesday. “I am not someone who is going to challenge. I will perform my duty. I will continue to work as per the Constitution,” he said. He also adjourned the house till Thursday after the BJP objected to the conduct of regular proceedings without the government proving it’s majority.Meanwhile, absconding I Monetary Advisory (IMA) scam accused Mansoor Khan released a video on Monday expressing his desire to return to India within 24 hours.Khan has been accused of cheating over 40,000 investors of Rs 2,000 crore. Thousands of complaints have been registered at the Commercial Street Police Station since his audio clip addressed to the then Commissioner T Suneel Kumar got leaked and went viral on social media on June 9.Live BlogFollow us for LIVE updates on Bangalore traffic, weather, power disruption updates, pollution checks, events, developments and much more from Bengaluru today| Click here to get LIVE news updates from Chennai Today SIT probing the #IMA case detained @rroshanbaig for questioning at the BIAL airport while he was trying leave along with @BSYBJP’s PA Santosh on a chartered flight to Mumbai. I was told that on seeing the SIT, Santhosh ran away while the team apprehended Mr. Baig. 1/2 pic.twitter.com/MmyH4CyVfP— H D Kumaraswamy (@hd_kumaraswamy) July 15, 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp Will come to the floor test, resignation was internal: Ramalinga Reddy Congress leader Ramalinga Reddy said he will come for the floor test tomorrow as his resignation was not accepted 15:06 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 Karnataka crisis: SC reserves order, verdict at 10.30 am tomorrow Supreme Court reserves order on the plea of Karnataka rebel MLAs. Order to be pronounced at 10.30 am tomorrow. Related News facebook twitter whatsapp Cab driver killed in truck hit-and-run in North Bengaluru A cab driver died in a collision between a container truck and his taxi in north Bengaluru in the early hours of Monday. Kiran Raju, a resident of Kanva Nagar, Nelamangala, was killed moments after the speeding container truck collided head-on with his cab at Makali around 3.30 am. Police are yet to find the CCTV footage of the accident and track down the truck driver. 12:01 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp Bengaluru police beefed up security at Roshan Baig’s house Around 20 police officers are at Shivajinagar MLA and former minister Roshan Baig’s house at Cleveland Road, Pulkeshi Nagar on duty inside and outside the place. Baig was detained at the Kempegowda airport by the SIT probing the IMA case. 13:31 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 17:52 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 Welcome CM’s move to approve Raghavendra Auradkar Committee Report on Police Reforms: Dy CM Expressing his support towards Karnataka CM HD Kumaraswamy’s move to approve Raghavendra Auradkar Committee Report on Police Reforms, deputy CM G Parameshwara tweeted, “As Home Minister, I had promised better pay & facilities sought by the report, for our policemen. Happy to have fulfilled our promise of improving facilities for our policemen!”Welcome CM @hd_kumaraswamy’s move to approve Raghavendra Auradkar Committee Report on Police Reforms. As Home Minister, I had promised better pay & facilities sought by the report, for our policemen.Happy to have fulfilled our promise of improving facilities for our policemen!— Dr. G Parameshwara (@DrParameshwara) July 16, 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp 15:38 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp Bangalore news July 3 highlights: CM announces Rs 2 lakh compensation for Chintamani bus accident victims Indigo passengers in Bengaluru face long queues after airline’s server crashes facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp 11:52 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp 11:13 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 Bengaluru: Congress MLAs arrive at a resort ahead of trust vote Meanwhile, in Bengaluru, Congress MLAs arrive at a resort ahead of the trust vote. facebook twitter whatsapp 12:47 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 08:46 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 Rebel MLAs hunting in pack to destabilise government: Kumaraswamy Karnataka CM H D Kumaraswamy says rebel MLAs hunting in pack to destabilise government, they went to hotel together. Senior advocate Rajeev Dhavan for Kumaraswamy says the Speaker can’t be compelled to the decide issue in time bound manner. Kumaraswamy maintains that SC doesn’t have jurisdiction to pass interim orders asking the Speaker to maintain status quo on MLAs resignation, disqualification. This is not Speaker vs Court; this is between CM and somebody who wants to become CM by bringing down govt, Dhavan tells the Court. facebook twitter whatsapp 09:41 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 SC takes suo motu cognizance of ‘alarming rise’ in child rape cases Supreme Court reserves order on the plea of Karnataka rebel MLAsBangalore news July 16 highlights: Amid the ongoing turmoil in the state, Karnataka Legislative Assembly Speaker K R Ramesh Kumar Monday scheduled a trust vote for the ruling Congress-JDS coalition government for 11 am on Thursday. He announced the decision of the trust vote after a meeting of the Business Advisory Council of the assembly. facebook twitter whatsapp Jayadeva flyover demolition postponed to next week, traffic affected in BTM layout and Jayanagara The demolition of Jayadeva flyover junction, which was scheduled on Monday, has been postponed to next week by Bangalore Metro Rail Corporation Ltd (BMRCL). The busy junction is being remodelled to accommodate an additional elevated road and the interchange Metro station of Reach 5 line (RV Road to Bommasandra) and Reach 6 line (Gottigere to Nagawara).The work is likely to affect areas like BTM Layout, Jayanagar and Bannerghatta Road. 12:14 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 Advertising Rebel Karnataka Congress MLA Ramalinga Reddy: I went to see doctor, it got delayed. Speakers’ office will call me, I will go today or tomorrow, whenever they call me. The reason of resignation was internal. I will have to come for the floor test, my resignation is not accepted. pic.twitter.com/1XtRuP63X3— ANI (@ANI) July 16, 2019 Top headlines from Bengaluru – July 16 * Karnataka crisis: SC reserves order, verdict at 10.30 am tomorrow* Congress MLAs shifted at a resort ahead of trust vote * SIT allows Roshan Baig to appear on 19 July for further enquiries* Baig was trying to escape, says Kumaraswamy* Two site engineers arrested in connection with building collapse* Jayadeva flyover demolition postponed to next weekClick here to read in detail Bangalore news July 8 highlights: Coalition government shaky as two more leave for Mumbai; no word yet from rebels Irrelevant to question why MLAs want to resign: Rohtagi Arguing the case for the rebel MLAs, Rohatgi said it was completely irrelevant to question why the lawmakers want to resign. “By not deciding, you (Speaker) are compelling a man to act against his wishes,” he told the court. He also added that it was absurd to demand proof when the MLAs have personally presented papers.  SIT allowed Roshan Baig to appear on 19 July for further enquiries Shivajinagar MLA and former minister Roshan Baig who was taken for enquiry/interrogation on Monday from Bangalore international airport at 10.30 pm by SIT in connection with IMA scam were questioned and allowed to appear on 19 July for further enquiries. Written by Express Web Desk | Bengaluru | Updated: July 16, 2019 7:17:09 pm 08:24 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 09:20 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 18:51 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 Two site engineers arrested in connection with building collapse last week Two site engineers were arrested in connection with collapse of the basements of two apartments on Hutchins Road, east Bengaluru, last week. Three prime accused, including owners of the structures, are still at large.The engineers Tamim and Nayazullah are from Kolar. The three prime suspects have approached a court seeking anticipatory bail — Mohammed Shoeb A Hameed and Mohammed Imtiaz A Hameed, owners of the buildings, and architect BM Sridhar.  10:11 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 Explained: What is Karnataka’s IMA scam? Senior Congress leader R Roshan Baig, who was detained at the Bengaluru airport on Monday night by an SIT probing the IMA Group ponzi scam, has used the political crisis in Karnataka as a card to hedge against his arrest in the case.In what has come to be known as the IMA scam, a private firm called I Monetary Advisory Group floated a ponzi scheme offering investors dream returns to the tune of 36 to 64 per cent on investments. The investment schemes of the firm were pitched as being in line with Sharia principles of Islam.READ: Explained: What is Karnataka’s IMA scam? Roshan Baig’s lawyers file petition for release Suspended Shivajinagar Congress MLA Roshan Baig’s lawyers file petition questioning his detention by SIT. The petition demands immediate release of the MLA. 12:27 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 14:04 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 Roshan Baig being questioned at CID Headquarters Roshan Baig, who was detained last night by SIT probing the IMA case, is currently being questioned at CID Headquarters at Carlton House. says TV  reports facebook twitter whatsapp 16:13 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 11 students ill after drinking tank water in Mandya Eleven students of a government high school took ill after drinking water from a tank that was allegedly laced with pesticide at A Hullukere village in the taluk on Monday. The students were first provided first aid at the Kothathi government hospital and later shifted to the Mandya Institute of Medical Sciences. A probe is on to find who had mixed poison in the drinking water tank, police said. The rural police have registered a case. Bengaluru: Congress MLAs arrive at Windflower Prakruthi resort,Devanahalli from Taj Yeshwantpur hotel. #Karnataka pic.twitter.com/73Jtim0ha6— ANI (@ANI) July 16, 2019 09:33 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 Around 20 police officers are at Shivajinagar MLA and former minister Roshan Baig’s house at Cleveland Road, Pulkeshi Nagar on duty inside and outside the place. Baig was detained at the Kempegowda airport by the SIT probing the IMA case. @IndianExpress video by @ralpharakal pic.twitter.com/dvONggMME2— EXPRESS Bengaluru (@IEBengaluru) July 16, 2019 19:17 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 Chief Minister H D Kumaraswamy alleges that BJP is helping Baig escape Soon after Baig was detained by SIT, Chief Minister H D Kumaraswamy tweeted “Today SIT probing the #IMA case detained @rroshanbaig for questioning at the BIAL airport while he was trying leave along with @BSYBJP’s PA Santosh on a chartered flight to Mumbai. I was told that on seeing the SIT, Santhosh ran away while the team apprehended Mr. Baig.”In another tweet, Kumaraswamy said, “BJP’s Yogeshwar was present at the time there.Its a shame that @BJP4Karnataka is helping a former minister escape, who is facing a probe in the #IMA case. This clearly shows #BJP’ s direct involvement in destabilizing the govt through horse trading.” facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp 09:00 (IST) 16 Jul 2019 BWSSB Water adalat today Water adalats will be held on Tuesday, from 9.30 am to 11 am. The disputes of consumers of Kengeri Ideal Homes, BEML Layout, RR Nagar service station will be settled in the office of the AEE (West-3) 5th Stage, 1st Main Road, BEML Layout, RR Nagar. Call 22945171 or 28611826.The disputes of consumers at Koramangala-1 and 2, Bellandur service station (coming under AEE (South-East-3) sub-division) will be settled. Call 22945389 or 22945243.The disputes of consumers of MNK Park, Mount Joy, Nagendra Block, Girinagar and Kathriguppe service station coming under AEE (South-West-3) sub-division will be settled in the office of the Assistant Executive Engineer (South-West-3) sub-division, Basavanagudi, MNK Park. Call 22945196 or 22945155. facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp IMA fraud: Congress’ Roshan Baig detained by SIT en route Mumbai to join rebel MLAs Senior Congress leader R Roshan Baig was detained at Bengaluru International Airport on Monday night by an SIT probing the multi-crore IMA Group ponzi scam. Baig is among the 16 MLAs of the ruling Congress-JDS government in Karnataka who have resigned since July 6 sending the coalition into turmoil.READ: IMA fraud: Congress’ Roshan Baig detained by SIT en route Mumbai to join rebel MLAs facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp facebook twitter whatsapp Roshan Baig detained for questioning in IMA case Shivajinagar MLA and former minister Roshan Baig was detained at the Kempegowda airport by the SIT probing the IMA case. Roshan Baig was to catch a flight to Mumbai. The MLA had sought time till July 19 to appear before the SIT. The Congress, JDS and BJP MLAs will move to resorts around Bangalore to protect their flock ahead of the floor test. While the trust vote will be taken up on Thursday, the voting will take place following discussions on the vote members of all parties.READ: Karnataka crisis: Speaker schedules trust vote for ThursdayIn his latest video, Mansoor Khan says he is suffering from three heart blockages for which he requires immediate treatment. The SIT, probing the IMA case, is yet to react to the video. Khan further says he was on “bed rest for the last 30 days”.READ: IMA scam: Bedridden for last 30 days, want to return in 24 hours, says Mansoor Khan in video 0 Comment(s)last_img read more

North Korea accuses expelled Australian student of spying

first_img After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Cabinet asks finance panel to consider securing funds for defence Sigley, 29, a graduate student in Korean literature at Kim Il Sung University in Pyongyang, was freed in North Korea on Thursday and deported on the same day. Until now, neither Sigley nor the North’s government had publicly explained why he had been detained.On Saturday, North Korea’s official Korean Central News Agency, using the initials for the North’s official name, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, said Sigley was caught Tuesday while “committing anti-DPRK incitement through the internet.”“He honestly admitted his spying acts of systematically collecting and offering data about the domestic situation of the DPRK and repeatedly asked for pardon, apologizing for encroachment upon the sovereignty of the DPRK,” the news agency said. North Korea expelled him with “humanitarian leniency,” it said. Top News Post Comment(s) Alek Sigley, Alek Sigley australia, australian student expelled in north korea, Alek Sigley spy, north korea expels australian student Alek Sigley, (Courtesy of the Sigley family via AP)North Korea said Saturday that Alek Sigley, the Australian student whom it deported this past week, had been a spy who admitted to “systematically” collecting information about the isolated country, with a state news agency reporting that he had been “caught red-handed.” Advertising Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Advertising Sigley could not be reached for comment. But after his release, he said as he emerged at Beijing’s international airport Thursday, “I’m OK, I’m good.” He declined then to address a reporter’s question about why he had been detained.While studying in Pyongyang, he had contributed occasional columns about his life in the North to outside news media, including NK News, which is based in Seoul, the South Korean capital, and specializes in news about North Korea.The Korean Central News Agency said Sigley had acted at the instigation of NK News and other “anti-DPRK” news outlets, providing them several times with information and photos he had collected in Pyongyang by making use of his foreign student card.Chad O’Carroll, head of NK News, said in response to the North Korean claim, “Alek Sigley’s well-read columns presented an apolitical and insightful view of life in Pyongyang, which we published in a bid to show vignettes of ordinary daily life in the capital to our readers.”Prime Minister Scott Morrison of Australia and Sigley have thanked Swedish diplomats for working on Australia’s behalf to help free him. Australia does not have an embassy in Pyongyang and relies on the Swedish Embassy there to protect its citizens in the North. By New York Times |Seoul | Published: July 7, 2019 11:38:12 amlast_img read more

Karnataka Day after promising to stay with Congress rebel MLA Nagaraj reaches

first_img Karnataka: SC to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook Related News “He has arrived here in the afternoon and is in the hotel where some other legislators are camping,” sources in Mumbai told PTI, adding that BJP leader R Ashok accompanied the legislator. With this, the total number of Karnataka MLAs in Mumbai stood at 15.In a bid to woo him back, the Congress leaders had held talks with Nagaraj on Saturday. Before leaving for Mumbai, the Hoskote MLA maintained that he intended to take the final call on the withdrawal of his resignation after discussions with Chikkaballapura MLA K Sudhakar.However, Congress MLA and former minister H K Patil said, “Nagaraj must have learnt that Sudhakar is in Mumbai and I feel he has gone there to bring him back.” Bracing for SC hearing and trust vote, Karnataka parties hide their MLAs Karnataka crisis: SC to give verdict on rebel MLAs plea against Speaker tomorrow NRC deadline approaching, families stranded in Assam floods stay home Karnataka crisis, karnataka mlas resignation, karnataka congress mlas resignation, rebel congress mlas, congress mlas resign, karnataka congress mlas resign, karnataka political crisis, karnataka mlas in mumbai, ramalinga reddy yeddyurappa, kumaraswamy, nagaraj indian express Congress rebel MLA M T B Nagaraj arrived in Mumbai on Sunday afternoon. (Photo: PTI)Dissident Karnataka Congress MLA MTB Nagaraj, who a day ago said he would remain with the Congress, arrived in Mumbai on Sunday and headed to the hotel where other legislators who have quit are camping. Karnataka: Supreme Court to rule today, says Speaker’s powers need relook By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 14, 2019 10:34:09 pmcenter_img Congress tries to win back rebel MLA Ramalinga ReddyOn Sunday too, the Grand Old Party stepped up its attempts to persuade Ramalinga Reddy, another rebel MLA, to withdraw his resignation from the state assembly. The party’s state working president Eshwar Khandre and senior leader H K Patil had a meeting with Reddy at his residence for about two hours.JP Nadda rejects horse-trading allegationsMeanwhile, BJP working president J P Nadda Sunday denied allegations of horse-trading and said Karnataka’s political crisis was triggered by the resignation of Rahul Gandhi as Congress president. “These are baseless allegations. (The crisis in Karnataka) is the Congress’ internal issue. Its national president (Rahul Gandhi) has resigned from the post and others are resigning from their posts,” PTI quoted Nadda as saying.He added that a new “political culture” has emerged under Narendra Modi’s leadership and those against ‘vote bank and dynasty’ politics were welcome to join BJP that is now an “all-pervasive” party.Resign or seek trust vote on Monday: Yeddyurappa to KumaraswamyKarnataka BJP chief BS Yeddyurappa also demanded that the Chief Minister HD Kumaraswamy should either resign immediately or seek a trust vote on Monday itself. Post Comment(s) Best Of Express Advertising Advertising In undecided Congress, first open call for Priyanka: She should be party chief “I demand that the Chief Minister, if he is honest and cares for the democratic system, should immediately resign or should move a motion seeking for trust vote on Monday itself,” Yeddyurappa said, asserting that the coalition government in the state had already lost the majority.“You (Kumaraswamy) don’t have a majority. So let them (coalition) ask for confidence vote or reign immediately. Tomorrow in the Business Advisory Committee meeting I will advise the same thing to Kumaraswamy and discuss,” he added.The Karnataka government is on the brink of collapse, with 16 MLAs from Congress-JDS tendering their resignations. If the resignations of the 16 rebel MLAs of the ruling Congress-JD(S) coalition are accepted, the coalition will have 101 MLAs in the 224-member House versus the BJP’s 105.last_img read more